Postdoc position in my lab

We currently offer a postdoc or research engineer position in the areas of Computational Social Science, Network Science, Big Data, and Social Network Analysis, to be filled immediately.

The applicant will join my team at the CRI to work on large-scale datasets to understand the dynamics of radicalisation of digital communities. In particular, the applicant will work on a project in collaboration with Hugo Micheron (ENS Paris) and Samuel Fraiberger (NYU, World Bank) to map the temporal evolution of the influence network of radical Islam on the web using large datasets from Twitter, Youtube and Facebook. The project is supported by a “Domaine d’Interet Majeur” funding from the region Ile de France.

For more information, visit the job page!

Our first hackathon with JOGL

With Just One Giant Lab we just organized our first hackathon on Open Data and Vaccination for our first program Co-Immune! We had 6 teams with great ideas and projects using data science to better understand vaccination hesitancy and access to vaccines. More below:

Lab projects

A lot has happened since I started my lab last year, and I wanted to showcase a bunch of projects that we have begun to tackle at CRI with my team, the Network Ties! Below you can find a poster presenting our work in quantifying innovation and large-scale collaboration in science and technology. These various projects combine physics-inspired modeling, network and data science to better understand how collective intelligence shape both learning and solving! If you’re interested in these projects, we are hiring! Do not hesitate to contact me for further information!

Workshop: enhancing collective intelligence to tackle humanity’s challenges in the digital age

For the first event after its launch last week, I am happy to invite you with Just One Giant Lab (JOGL) to an afternoon of round tables and workshops to open the collaboration around the construction of JOGL itself.

|| On the agenda ||

During this very special event, experts in open science, collective intelligence, social impact and platform design will share their experience and exchange with the participants around two round tables and a workshop.

The first round table will open discussions about how to enhance collective intelligence for social impact. In particular, how we can facilitate “giant” collaborations around the globe. The second round table will reflect on how to design digital platforms to implement collective intelligence at scale, in the context of open science. After a coffee break, the afternoon will end with a workshop where participants will have the possibility to test the JOGL platform, provide feedback and share with the team what features they would dream to see on JOGL.

The idea? JOGL is a platform with a strong vision but a design in constant construction. This event aims to give the opportunity to all to participate in this design and help build the future of the JOGL platform. As such, feedback shared by participants will be taken into consideration to serve as a roadmap for the implementation of the upcoming features of JOGL and make it the platform everyone needs.

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Connecting the dots: a network workshop at CRI

On Saturday 18th May I will organise a network workshop at the CRI! It is intended to be a hands-on experience learning about, mining, manipulating, describing and visualizing networks. It will take place in the learning center of the CRI from 10am to 5pm.

To register to the event, go to the event page! The workshop requires no background or prior experience in Network analysis. Just make sure to bring your MOTIVATION to learn and build your own network! It is intended for learners of all levels (bachelors, masters, PhD). We are open to welcome people outside from CRI as well. Please make sure you have registered for the event. You will be expected to participate actively in the activities of the workshop. Please bring your laptop for the workshop, as you will use them for the hands-on experience. If you do not have a laptop, please inform us so that we can try and find one for you!

Visit and talk at the Santa Fe Institute

I will be visiting the Santa Fe Institute for Complex Systems from Wednesday 20 Feb to Friday 22 Feb. This will be the occasion to discuss potential projects with future CRI fellow and “network archeologist” Stefani Crabtree, as well as discover this fantastic place in the desert mountains of New Mexico!

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Hubtopia talk on network science

This Wednesday 17 October, I will talk (in French) about hubs and network science at the interdisciplinary co-working space “Le Onzieme Lieu” in Paris. The talk will be in French and for a lay audience. After the talk, we will organise a network game with Liuba Tupikina and there will be an exhibit of network art by Roberto Toro and Katja Heuer, all colleagues from the CRI. The place is fantastic, as it mixes a traditional co-working space setup with artist galleries. Come hang with us and discuss networks!

hubtopia

New paper on the dynamics of biological networks in PNAS

This work (pdf) was done during my postdoc at the BarabasiLab. We investigated the role of network topology in accurately predicting perturbation patterns in biological network. Indeed, the development of high-throughput technologies has allowed mapping a significant proportion of interactions between biochemical entities in the cell. In short, we begin to have a good mapping of the subcellular “interacotme”. However, it is unclear how much information is lost given the lack of measurements on the kinetic parameters governing the dynamics of these interactions. Using biochemical networks with experimentally measured kinetic parameters, we show that a knowledge of the network topology offers 65–80% accuracy in predicting the impact of perturbation patterns. In other words, we can use the increasingly accurate topological models to approximate perturbation patterns, bypassing expensive kinetic constant measurement. These results could open new avenues in modeling drug action and in identifying drug targets relying on the human interactome only.